TOP / Fellows / 2017 (6th cohort)

2017 Fellows (6th cohort)

Megumi Aoyama

Affiliation
TV Asahi Corporation, Announcer Department (through July 2017)
Academic background
Bachelor in Economics,
Kyoto University
Dispatched to:
Master of Science in Foreign Service Program, School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University,
Duration
August 2017-

Research theme:

Analyzing international gender issues and framing comprehensive public outreach campaigns and communication strategies to empower women.

Determined to broadcast the “voices of the unheard,” I entered the world of media in 2011 as an announcer. However, I soon noticed that it was difficult to hear the true voices of women. Biased and stereotypical representation of women and the absence of a female perspective in broadcast information and public outreach has played a crucial role in forming social identities and gender disparities in society today, not only in Japan but in many parts of the world where women are in vulnerable conditions. International agencies such as UN Women have been taking initiatives to raise the profile of women in media coverage and to promote gender-sensitive reporting. Harmful gender stereotypes must be tackled and effective communication strategies must be undertaken to educate society about the benefits of greater diversity to truly empower women.
Through the International Fellowship, I hope to gain training in critical analysis of gender issues in an international context, communicating strategically to international society, and to explore strategic approaches to influence people’s thoughts and actions through public outreach.

Masanori Isobe

Affiliation
Project Researcher, Department of Neuropsychiatry, The University of Tokyo Hospital
Academic background
Ph.D. in Medicine, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine
Dispatched to:
Behavioral and Clinical Neuroscience Institute (BCNI) and Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge
Duration
April 2017-

Research theme:

What prevents good social adaptation among psychiatric patients: individual factors and environmental factors

As a clinical psychiatrist, I have supported the social adaptation of psychiatric patients from various perspectives, such as clinical psychiatry, correctional medicine, occupational medicine, and employment transfer support. Successful social adaptation requires patients to have the ability to adapt and be supported by the appropriate circumstances. Given that inflexible behaviouralalteration can prevent successful social adaptation, I have recently begun to examine the decision-making process underlying this inflexibility. As a fellow of the international fellowship program, my aim is to clarify the underlying mechanisms that prevent behaviouralalteration. Whilst at the University of Cambridge, I plan to investigate, from a multidimensional viewpoint, how individual factors (e.g. cognition, genetics, personality) affect decision-making flexibility. Moreover, I will also explore a prospective support system for the social adaptation of psychiatric patients,

Kazuhiro Obayashi

Affiliation
Associate Professor, Graduate School of Law, HitotsubashiUniversity
Academic background
Ph.D. in Political Science, George Washington University
Dispatched to:
Visiting Fellow at the Changing Character of War Centre (CCW) at the University of Oxford
Duration
August 2017-
Publications
Rebel Recruitment and Information Problems(Routledge, 2018)

Research Theme:

State Counterinsurgency Strategies

In the late 1990s, I took part in a volunteer program in MehebaRefugee Camp in Zambia as an undergraduate student. It was through this experience that I began to take an interest in civil wars and their interaction with international society. The main focus of my research so far has been on the organization and behavior of rebel groups in civil war and peacebuilding. I have been focusing particularly on conflicts in Sri Lanka, Uganda, and Nigeria. As an International Fellow of the Nippon Foundation, I plan to pay more attention to the state, the other side of the conflict dyad, and examine how the state’s counterinsurgency strategy interacts with the organization and behavior of rebel groups. This research bridges the gap between the two bodies of literature on rebel organizations and on state counterinsurgency strategies.

Ayako Kobayashi

Affiliation
Ph.D. Candidate, Graduate School of Law, HitotsubashiUniversity
Academic background
School of International and Public Policy, HitotsubashiUniversity
Dispatched to:
BelferCenter for Science and International Affairs, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University
Duration
August 2017-

Research theme:

Humanitarian Access Constraints in Civil Wars

I have been conducting research on intrastate armed conflicts (civil wars) and the role of the international community both in academia and policy practice. Working in a post-conflict country, I feel that it is imperative to understand the actors and dynamics of conflict to better enable the international community to overcome challenges in the field of conflict resolution and peacebuilding. My Ph.D. study focuses on constraints on humanitarian access, because of which humanitarian aid organizations cannot reach people in need, and seeks to identify the conditions under which the parties of a conflict restrict such access. During my international fellowship, I will analyze multiple cases comparatively to test hypotheses and complete my dissertation.

Kazumi Nara

Affiliation
Planning officer of Policy Division for Universal Design, Policy Bureau, Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism
Academic background
The University of Tokyo, Graduate Schools for Law and Politics, Japan
Dispatched to:
MSc Regional and Urban Planning, London School of Economics and Political Science
Duration
September 2017-

Research Theme:

Evaluating the health impact of rapid urbanization in the developing world Sustainable Transport, Regional and Urban Policy for Ageing Society –From the Perspective of Population Health

Since 1996 when I enter the former Ministry of Transportation (current the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism), I have had considerable professional experience in policy making in the areas of not only transport and Tourism but also tax planning at both MLIT and local governments such as Nara prefectural government. My major administrative fields are promoting accessible transport policy, supporting for victims and families of public transport accidents, reforming local tax system and policy. Holding 6th APEC tourism ministerial meeting, negotiating for final agreement on “Agreement on Government Procurement of WTO”, planning of new installation of railway are some of my significant work experiences. As a fellow of the International Fellowship, I will undertake regional and urban planning. My purpose of undertaking this course is to acquire practical and statistical ability as a policy-maker, by combining my work experience with this study. Specifically, I plan to study the relationship between transport and urban development policy and population health, comparison of foreign countries’ policies as well as build networks with people who have various backgrounds.

Hidehiko Hokoi

Affiliation
Economic Affairs Bureau, Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Trade Negotiator (Senior Deputy Director for FTA/EPA Negotiations)
(through August 2017)
Academic background
Faculty of Law, Keio University
Dispatched to:
LL.M. candidate, Stanford Law School
Duration
August 2017-
Publications
(1) Various issues of the Financial Instruments and Exchange Act (Shoji Homu2012) (co-author)
(2) Clause-by-Clause Guide to J-REIT Law (KinzaiInstitute for Financial Affairs, Inc., 2012)(co-author)
(3) Financial Instruments and Exchange Act (Second Volume) Vendor Regulation (KinzaiInstitute for Financial Affairs, Inc. 2009) (co-author)
(4) Banking Business Certification Exam -Exam Prep Series (Financial Instruments and Exchange Law Level 3) (Economic Legal Research Institute, 2008) (co-author)
(5) Financial Instruments and Exchange Law for Financial Institutions (Text No. 2) (Economic Legal Research Institute, 2008) (co-author)
(6) “Investment management business –recent developments in the regulatory framework in Japan”TheEuromoneyGlobal Investment Funds Review 2013
(7) “Corporate governance in the United Arab Emirates”(Monthly KansayakuJournal, No 617)
(8) “The investment approach and law practice in the UAE, the hub of the Middle East”(Banking Law Journal, No.1942) (March 25, 2012)

Research theme:

Contemporary challenges of free trade agreements and international investment agreements

I joined the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan after I had worked at both domestic and international law firms for nearly 10 years. In the Ministry, I became a trade negotiator for international investment agreements and specific areas of the economic partnership agreements between Japan and other trade partners such as the European Union, Canada, Turkey and Turkmenistan. I also assisted the negotiation of the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP) as a member of the Cabinet Secretariat and then engaged in the Diet approval process for it.

The ultimate goal of these free trade deals is not merely to pursue economic benefits but also to promote world peace and stability through the unification of the global economy. In order to achieve this end, it is absolutely vital for Japanese citizens and enterprises to enjoy the benefits derived from these agreements, and proactive commitments by lawyers in the private sector are one of the essential factors for that goal.

Based on this perspective, my aim is to contribute to society through my written works and public lectures by conducting advanced research with regard to the contemporary challenges facing free trade agreements and international investment agreements with the strong support of the International Fellowship Program.

Yusuke "Ed" Matsuda

Affiliation
Certified NPO Teach For Japan
Academic background
Harvard Graduate School of Education (EdM)
Dispatched to:
Stanford Graduate School of Business (Master of Science in Management for Experienced Leaders)
Duration
July 2017-

Research theme:

Research on Collective Impact and Leadership Framework that enables Social Innovation and Impact

There are still 1.6 million children living in poverty in Japan, Teach For Japan needs to expand urgently by developing better strategies for fundraising, fellow recruitment, training, and advocacy. In order to scale, TFJ needs to develop a strong organizational structure and culture with a well thought out growth strategy. For example, funding will be essential to expand TFJ, but compared to the United States or Europe, fundraising practices in Japan are underdeveloped. There is also a urgent needs for NPO's to work collaboratively with Government and Corporates to enhance impact. During my fellowship, I would like to understand the
①creativity and effectiveness in fundraising strategy
②nature of collective impact strategies
③leadership and management practices
for successful non-profit organizations in the US.

Reo Morimitsu

Affiliation
Japanese Red Cross Society SuwaHospital Roster member of Psychosocial Reference Centre, International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies
Academic background
MA in Clinical Psychology, Graduate school of Shinshu University
Dispatched to:
Graduate Certificate Disaster Mental Health Program, Disaster Mental Health Institute, University of South Dakota
Duration
August 2017-

Research theme:

Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in International Humanitarian Response

My first encounter with a humanitarian crisis was witnessing the tragedy of 9.11 when I was attending a summer English program in the United States in 2001. Six years later, I joined the Japanese Red Cross Society (JRCS) and became the first clinical psychologist in JRCS history who works for international missions. Since then, I have worked on various Mental Health and Psychosocial Support (MHPSS) missions within the international Red Cross movement. From 2015 to 2017, I also have been involved in a project within the framework of the Japanese government’s ODA which provides psychosocial support for conflict-affected people in Ukraine.
As an International Fellow, I would like to strengthen my expertise and prepare for future practice in the area of MHPSS response by studying more about disaster mental health as well as leadership during mass casualties. Unfortunately, there are many humanitarian crises happening in the world these days. Given the fact that crisis can cause severe and long-term psychological and emotional impact on the well-being of people affected, MHPSS work in emergencies is one of the most challenging issues in humanitarian global responses. When I finish my studies, I would like to bring my learning back to field practice as much as possible and am willing to devote myself to develop knowledge/experience-sharing opportunities with other emergency responders.