TOP / Fellows / 2016 (5th cohort)

2016 Fellows (5th cohort)

Keishi Abe

Affiliation
International Affairs Division, Minister’s Secretariat, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare
Academic background
Degree, School of Medicine, Hokkaido University
Dispatched to:
Graduate program, School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University
Duration
July, 2016-June, 2018

Research theme:

International response to a global crisis and a norm-setting in its aftermath

Since joining the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in 2013, I have been engaged in crisis management for infectious diseases which have the potential to spread across the world – the Ebola outbreak in West Africa and the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) outbreak in Korea. In a globalized world, a crisis on the other side of the globe can easily cross borders and affect our own country. Hence, we need to implement domestic and foreign policies in a cooperative manner. Under such circumstances, given the lessons learned from the global response to Ebola, Japan, with the G7 presidency in 2016, is taking the lead in the World Health Organization (WHO) reform regarding health emergencies in preparation for a future crisis.
Through the International Fellowship, I will research the policies of the international response to global crises and the methods of norm-setting in the aftermath to improve policy planning ability for issues facing international community.

Yosuke Inoue

Affiliation
School of International Health, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo (through June, 2016)
Academic background
Ph.D in Health Sciences, School of International Health, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo
Dispatched to:
The Carolina Population Center, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Duration
July, 2016 – June, 2018

Research theme:

Evaluating the health impact of rapid urbanization in the developing world

As an anthropologist (biological anthropology and human ecology, in particular), I have been engaged in health-related research among rural communities in Hainan Island, China. Since the designation of the island as a special economic zone in 1988, there has been a westernization of the lifestyle while income inequality has widened, with both processes affecting the population’s physical and psychological health. I have undertaken research to evaluate these health effects with my findings being published in peer-reviewed academic journals.
As an International Fellow, I plan to use large-scale cohort data from various developing countries and analyze it using epidemiological and public health research methodologies. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has been conducting a large-scale cohort follow-up survey called the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS) since 1989 in order to investigate the association between urbanization and health across China. I would like to extend and build on the research I have previously undertaken in rural China by using and analyzing the CHNS data. I also plan to collaborate in the future with researchers at UNC who are studying non-communicable diseases in developing countries.

Hiroko Oji

Academic background
Graduate School of Asia-Pacific Studies, Waseda University
Dispatched to:
The Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Brandeis University
Duration
August, 2016-December, 2017
Publications
Hiroko Oji "The empowerment of female migrant workers through the Chinese NGO Migrant Women's Club" (Jun Nishikawa, Takashi Yagi, Kazumi Shimizu ed. “Rebuilding Social Science,” Akashi, 2007)

Research Theme:

Social Entrepreneurship and Impact Management

"How can we rebuild a societal structure which is based on a disparity of wealth?" I have been consistently aware of this issue since I was a student. After completing my postgraduate studies, I worked for approximately five years each at a private company and a non-profit organization. At the company, I participated in many mergers and acquisitions as a member of the legal department, and as a member of a non-profit organization supporting developing countries, I was engaged in projects in many wide-ranging fields in Cambodia including human rights, medical treatment and nutrition. By receiving the International Fellowship, I will learn about starting up and operating social businesses which possess the strong points of both businesses and non-profit organizations, with an objective of constructing a model of societal structure reform through the empowerment of people considered to be socially vulnerable. After completing my studies, I would like to achieve a reduction in disparity through social businesses and rebuilding the structure of society throughout Asia, including Japan.

Terumi Okaku

Affiliation
Representative Director and Founder, Live On
Academic background
Degree, Journalism and Communications Study, Faculty of Social Studies, Doshisha University
Dispatched to:
MA Program, Comparative and International Social Policy Course, the University of York
Duration
September, 2016-September, 2017
Publication
How to Live with Something Lost (in Japanese)” (Taiwanese edition.)
Caring for Suicide (in Japanese)” (co-author)
Living with Loss (in Japanese)” (co-author)

Research theme:

The development of grief care as a social system in the U.K.

After the experience of my mother committing suicide in 2003, over the 10 years which have passed since the Basic Act on Suicide Prevention was enacted in 2006 I have been giving lectures, training and courses on grief care (care for the bereaved) for local governments, religious figures and schools throughout Japan. “Live on” charity organization, which I started in 2009, works with a goal of "creating a society where grief care is in everyone’s hand" and as grief care is recognized as primary care in U.K. and there is already a structure (social policy) established in which the bereaved family are provided with information from medical professionals after losing a loved one, I chose to study at a British graduate school. Furthermore, as Europe has also been building a network of support organizations for the bereaved who have lost family members, I would like to study how NGOs and social policies effectively ensure provision of grief care in order to be able to influence social policy in Japan upon my return.

Tadayuki Tanimura

Affiliation
Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare
Academic background
Degree, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka University
Dispatched to:
MSc Health Policy, Planning & Financing, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE)
Duration
September, 2016-September, 2017

Research Theme:

Effective Measures towards the Achievement of Universal Health Coverage (UHC)

With the desire to contribute to global healthcare using the experiences and knowledge I have obtained in Japan, after graduating from university, I entered the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare as a doctor and have been involved with efforts such as the medical services payment system, organ transplants, and the global End TB Strategy (secondment to WHO), and since 2014, I have been engaged in bilateral cooperation for assisting development of public health insurance systems in low- and middle-income countries. Japan achieved universal health insurance coverage in 1961 and from the experience of enjoying long and healthy lives, is working to promote the UHC system of basic health services that every person around the world can access at an affordable cost, declaring that it will contribute proactively to the strengthening of health systems. In order to contribute to this cause, as an International Fellow I will research effective measures to be undertaken in order to achieve UHC by doing comparative research which examines other countries as case studies, and analysing the challenges, measures and processes to go through before UHC can be achieved based on the experience of Japan and other countries.

Yusuke Masaki

Affiliation
Deputy Director, Secretarial Division, Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications
Academic background
Bachelor of Laws, University of Tokyo
Dispatched to:
Regional Studies–East Asia A.M. program, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University
Duration
July 2016–July 2018

Research theme:

Contemporary Challenges and Solutions for Democracy in East Asia

After joining the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications, I was involved in the analysis of municipal finance at the Yamaguchi Prefectural Government, and then municipal mergers and decentralization reform at the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications and the Cabinet Office. At the Kumamoto Prefectural Government, I tackled the problem of Minamata disease. Moreover, I promoted the prefectural mascot “Kumamon” and supervised the management of financial affairs. Recently, I engaged in the restoration and reconstruction efforts following the Kumamoto earthquakes.
As an International Fellow, I am studying the contemporary challenges of democracy from different angles, not only in emerging nations, but also in fully developed advanced nations. I am looking at civil societies and the history thereof in East Asia as well as economic theories, political philosophies, and democratic theories and practices since Ancient Greece. I will search for a way to realize the “expansion of citizens’ true autonomy,” the issue which remains after the Decentralization Reforms. In order to do so, I will analyze the kinds of challenges advanced nations face in democratic structures, especially in developed democracies in East Asia. Finally, I hope to look at the kinds of structures that can be well theorized and well-functioning in order to resolve the above-mentioned challenges.

Masahiko Mukaino

Affiliation
Senior assisstant professor, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine I, Fujita Health University
Academic background
Doctorate, Keio University School of Medicine
Dispatched to:
Swiss Paraplegic Research
Duration
April, 2016 – March, 2017

Research theme:

Development of evaluation system of human functioning using ICF (International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health) in the rehabilitation clinics

I have had a keen interest in rehabilitation for nerve damage, beginning with spinal cord injuries, which stems from a visit to a spinal cord injury rehabilitation center as a student, and I have been consistently involved with rehabilitative medical care since my graduation from the medical faculty of Kyushu University in 2003.
I am currently engaged in clinical studies as a specialist in rehabilitation medicine, and along with researching behavior analysis and robotics in order to obtain more highly effective practice exercises, I am working on the forging of an evaluation system for human functioning (daily life activities, social activity, and so on) employing the ICF (International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health) as an initiative to improve the quality of rehabilitation. ICF is developed by WHO and expected to be used for objective evaluation of functioning, for example in the international comparative studies and the research to investigate intervention effectiveness, but at present, it has not yet spread widely in clinical settings.
As an International Fellow, I will study at Swiss Paraplegic Research, which is taking a leading role in international collaborative research aimed at introducing ICF into clinical settings. I would like to contribute to improving the quality of rehabilitation by working together with an international team to build a model for introducing ICF to clinical settings from a clinician’s perspective.

Yui Yamaoka

Affiliation
Health Services Research Laboratory, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences Majors of Medical Sciences, University of Tsukuba
Academic background
Doctorate, Clinical Sciences, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences
Dispatched to:
University of Oklahoma
Duration
August, 2016 - July, 2018

Research theme:

Evaluation of preventive interventions toward chronic child neglect

While working as a pediatrician, I encountered children who had been disabled by child abuse and serious injuries and even those who died from it, and I am concerned with "preventable” child abuse. I have carried out research on cases in Japan of death from neglect, unintentional injuries with infants, and abusive head trauma. Next, I will study as an International Fellow at the Center on Child Abuse and Neglect at the University of Oklahoma in order to study the Child Death Review system, which is being implemented in foreign countries (investigating case studies of deaths and suggesting preventative public health intervention). Furthermore, I will participate in the Interdisciplinary Training Program, a program at Oklahoma University, which studies child abuse with multidisciplinary professionals. I will learn how educational system works with a multidisciplinary team from medical, child welfare and judicial fields. My future objective is to build a research system for child abuse in Japan and to further my studies and knowledge in order to connect it with the cultivation of professionals in the field.