TOP / Fellows / 2013 (2nd cohort)

2013 Fellows (2nd cohort)

Tatsuhiko Inatani

Tatsuhiko Inatani

ACTIVITIES

Affiliation
Associate Professor, Graduate School of Law, Kyoto University
Academic background
JD, Kyoto University of Law School
Dispatched to:
Institut d’Etudes Politiques de Paris and the University of Chicago
Duration
September 2013-August 2015

Research theme:

Comparative institutional analysis of criminal justice systems

Since I started working as an assistant professor at the Graduate School of Law, Kyoto University, I have been engaged in research on criminal justice systems. In doing research, I have put emphasis mainly on the quest for legislation theory/legal hermeneutics theory which makes our criminal justice system more appropriate. In my research I have tried to show a new direction in the legal hermeneutics theory of the code of criminal procedure and the theory of the criminal justice system of our country using various methods such as comparative analysis, behavioral economics, political economics, game theory and cognitive science. As a fellow of the International Fellowship Program, in the institute where I will conduct my research, possibly in cooperation with the institute, I intend to explore political ideas on punishment, to obtain the skill for conducting more sophisticated comparative institutional analysis and to conduct field surveys of judicial systems of the countries that I will visit.

ACTIVITIES

Mayumi Shirasawa

Mayumi Shirasawa

ACTIVITIES

Affiliation
Associate Professor, Research and Support Center on Higher Education for the Hearing Impaired and Visually Impaired, Tsukuba University of Technology
Academic background
PhD in Disability Sciences, Graduate School, Division of Special Education, University of Tsukuba
Dispatched to:
Rochester Institute of Technology
Duration
September 2013-August 2014
Publication
(Joint authorship) 『College Note-Taking Handbook (in Japanese)
(Joint authorship) 『Guide Book for Supporting Hearing-Impaired Students (in Japanese)

Research theme:

Guaranteeing the quality of higher education for the people with disabilities in a global society

Since my school days, I have consistently addressed issues related to higher education for the people with disabilities. Efforts to ensure that students who are deaf or hard of hearing can participate in class and to enable them to receive education of higher quality are my life’s work, and I have been working on these issues through both research and practice. As a fellow of the International Fellowship Program, I will take up forward-looking examples of higher education for people with disabilities in the United States and reveal details of practice designed to ensure advanced and specialized education. In concrete terms, I will cover 3 special programs and multiple colleges of small and medium size, and collect information on the systems of the universities as a whole, including organizations which provide support services and faculty systems. By doing so, I will search for the factors which enable those universities to administer programs and services and reveal the possibility of introducing them at universities in Japan.

ACTIVITIES

Kenji Tanaka

Kenji Tanaka

Affiliation
Director of General Affairs, Logistics Policy Division, Policy Bureau, Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism
Academic background
Faculty of Law, University of Tokyo
Dispatched to:
Master of Public Administration Course, Institute of Public Affairs, London School of Economics
Duration
September 2013-July 2015

Research theme:

Enhancement of policymaking ability on transport and tourism, and building international networks

Since 1995 when I join the former Ministry of Transportation (current the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism), I have engaged in administrative operations and research activities with a central focus on traffic. My major achievements so far are the development of a basic law for transport, handling disaster waste from the Great East Japan Earthquake, maintaining airline routes for remote islands in Hokkaido, management reform of Hokkaido Air System, leasing of the Senkaku islands, and establishment of a tourism oriented-country policy. As a fellow of the International Fellowship Program, I will major in public policy and try to acquire knowledge and skills concerning econometric analysis for policy making, management of administrative organizations, and comparison of foreign countries’ policies as well as to enhance my ability to deepen mutual understanding with people who have various backgrounds, and build networks with them.

Yukari Hino

Yukari Hino

Affiliation
Deputy Director , Energy Efficiency and Conservation Division, Energy Conservation and Renewable Energy Department, Resources and Energy Agency, Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry
Academic background
BA in Economics, Faculty of Economics, Kyoto University
Dispatched to:
First year: Columbia University
Second year: Visiting Scholar, The Brookings Institution
Duration
October 2013-June 2015

Research theme:

Development Economy

I joined the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry in 2003 and engaged in promoting cooperation (new partnership) among small and medium-size enterprises in different fields, the planning and practice of ADR (Alternative Dispute Resolution) for business revitalization, the examination of laws and regulations, and launching the “Smart Grid/Smart Community.” At present, I am in charge of revising energy-saving laws, budgets, tax systems and regulation reform for promoting energy saving in Japan. As a fellow of the International Fellowship Program, I will major in global financial policies and development economy, which are closely related to economic and industrial policies. I will also seek to build a network of people from around the world who are involved in financial, fiscal and trade policies and international organizations.

Taisuke Hirose

Taisuke Hirose

ACTIVITIES

Affiliation
Associate, 32th cohort, The Matsushita Institute of Government and Management
Academic background
BA, Department of International Relations, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, National Defense Academy of Japan
Dispatched to:
Visiting Fellow, Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), US
Duration
August 2013-September 2014

Research theme:

International research, development and production model of Japan in the Japan-U.S. defense technology cooperation

In 2004 I joined the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force. After working as a top senior official of ships on an escort ship, an Aegis warship and a marine sweeper, I worked in the research and development unit. During the period, I had training in navigation around the world, being sent to the Indian Ocean, working as a liaison officer for Japan-U.S. joint exercises and studying in America twice for acquiring knowledge and skills related to Aegis systems and missile defense. In 2011, I retired from the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force and enrolled in the program at the Matsushita Institute of Government and Management, a public interest incorporated foundation. In the future I seek to play a role in national policy, centering mainly on the fields of diplomacy and security. As a fellow of the International Fellowship Program, I will conduct research and studies under the theme, “A key to develop Japan-U.S. alliance: the future of Japan-U.S. joint research & development and joint production” as a visiting research fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in America. In particular, with the prospect of fostering and strengthening Japan’s defense production and technical basis, I will conduct research and studies in the fields of joint research & development and joint production in which Japan and the United States may find new cooperation. At the same time, I will study the policy for military industry in the United States especially after the 1980s in order to extract political and policy issues which we should address in the future.

ACTIVITIES

Sayaka Fujii

Sayaka Fujii

ACTIVITIES

Affiliation
Associate Professor, Division of Policy and Planning Sciences, Faculty of Engineering, Information and Systems, University of Tsukuba
Academic background
PhD in Urban Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo
Dispatched to:
Department of Human Geography, University of Toronto Scarborough, Canada
Duration
September 2013-August 2014

Research theme:

A study on the actual condition and problems in revitalizing public housing developments in Toronto city

My field of specialty is city planning and I have engaged in examining the ways that plans, regulations and projects should work in order to achieve the formation of proper urban space and to secure comfortable residential environments, particularly in built-up areas. By analyzing the situation and comparing internationally, problems of systems are identified demonstratively. I have studied to examine measures to improve and complement those problems. The main themes of my studies are empirical studies on the effect of designation, problems and utilization strategy in the current city planning and zoning of Japan, studies on resident-based drafting and management of city planning at the district level, and studies on sustainable revitalization of residential areas in an aging society with fewer children. As a fellow of the International Fellowship Program, I will reveal the project program, the state of implementation and the outcome of the project for revitalizing public housing developments in Canada by conducting field investigation and by researching persons involved, through which I aim at having some implications for revitalizing developments in Japan.

ACTIVITIES

Satoru Mori

Satoru Mori

ACTIVITIES

Affiliation
Professor, Faculty of Law, Hosei University
Academic background
Ph.D., Graduate Schools for Law, University of Tokyo
Dispatched to:
Visiting Scholar, The Elliott School of International affairs, The George Washington University
Duration
June 2013-March 2015
Publication
The Vietnam War and Alliance Diplomacy: The Impact of British and French Peace Initiatives on U.S. Policy, 1964-1968, University of Tokyo Press, 2009 (in Japanese)

Research theme:

American strategies for Asia

My field of specialty is the foreign and security policies of modern America and I have been engaging in roughly two kinds of work. One is to study the history of international relations and the other is to conduct research, analyze and make proposals concerning today’s politics and foreign policies. As an International Fellowship fellow, I am planning to do research with a focus on American policies toward Asia, particularly strategies for Asia in the Nixon era. The vast majority of studies on the history of foreign policies/international relations in the Nixon era focused on the history of negotiations such as Sino-America rapprochement and withdrawal from Vietnam. However, in the research that I intend to do during the Fellowship, I will clarify, beyond the process of establishing the so-called “Nixon Doctrine,” what kind of emergencies America specifically assumed in building strategies to defend Asia, using primary documents which were declassified in recent years. In doing this, domestic factors such as bargaining for the defense budget between President and Congress will be covered and attention will be focused on the correlation between monetary/fiscal factors and national defense strategies.

ACTIVITIES