TOP / Fellows / 2015 (4th cohort)

2015 Fellows (4th cohort)

Kenya Ie

Kenya Ie

Affiliation
Assistant professor, Department of General Medicine, Mie University Hospital
Academic background
Degree, School of Medicine, Chiba University
Dispatched to:
Family Medicine Faculty Development Fellowship (combined with Multidisciplinary Master of Public Health), University of Pittsburgh
Visiting Fellow on the Postgraduate Fellowship Programme in Family Medicine, Monash University
Duration
April 2015 - April 2017

Research theme:

Faculty development for home health/family medicine

As a child, I decided to pursue a career as a doctor through an encounter with a wonderful family doctor. After becoming a pulmonologist following graduation from a medical school, from my own experience of being a respiratory patient, I moved on to the field of home health/family medicine to train as a family doctor with the capacity to provide more holistic medicine. While conducting clinical practices, I have been engaged in the implementation and promotion of community-based medical education as well as research on the quality of practice. As an International Fellow, I would like to focus on the research on faculty development (development of human resources/organization in the field of medicine) which has led to the improved quality of medical sevices in the US. I am also planning to enroll in a master’s program in public health at the university to learn group approaches, as one of the foundations of this field. I would like to contribute to improving the quality of medical services in Japan through the enhancement of faculty development in home health/family medicine.

Kanako Okano

Kanako Okano

Affiliation
Promotion of International Environmental Cooperation, Policy Planning Section, General Affairs Division, Bureau of Environment, Tokyo Metropolitan Government
Academic background
Degree, Anglo-American Studies, Kobe City University of Foreign Studies
Dispatched to:
MPA program, King’s College London, University of London
Duration
July 2015 - July 2017

Research theme:

Inter-city cooperation in the field of climate change

Having a keen interest in exchange among different countries and cultures for a positive impact on people’s everyday lives as a student, I have been engaged in environment-related work for the Metropolitan Government of Tokyo since 2011. I am currently in charge of promoting inter-city cooperation in the area of climate change as well as anti-air pollution technology cooperation projects. As an International Fellow, I would like to study and compare pioneering anti-climate change efforts in cities and inter-city cooperation to identify effective ways in which cities can cooperate in this field. I will be cooperating with the Large Cities Climate Leadership Group (C40) in my research activities. After returning to Japan, I hope to pursue ideal ways of inter-city cooperation which are beneficial to policy management in individual cities, in order to contribute to the promotion of Tokyo’s environmental policies.

Yuichiro Ono

Yuichiro Ono

Affiliation
Assistant Section Chief[1], Local Public Finance Division, Local Public Financial Bureau, Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications
Academic background
Degree, Faculty of Law, The University of Tokyo
Dispatched to:
MPA Program, London School of Economics
Duration
July 2015 - July 2017

Research Theme:

Research on policy analysis/management conducive to the achievement of sustainability of local community

I joined the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications (MIC) in 2009. I was dispatched to Shimane Prefecture, where I was involved in developing plans designed to bring more people returning or moving to Shimane, a prefecture which has been making pioneering efforts to combat depopulation. I have also been involved in the development of regional finance systems including the introduction of a foreign resident registry system and formulation of regional finance plan designed to guarantee the funds needed for local municipalities to provide a certain level of administrative service.
Through the International Fellowship, I would like to conduct research with a focus on the economic analysis of policy effects and effective policy management to ensure that the public sector can fulfill the roles expected from local communities facing issues of declining population and aging society which are shared by many industrialized nations.

Yuichi Kawamoto

Yuichi Kawamoto

Affiliation
Lawyer (admitted in Japan)
Academic background
Master's Degree, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Komaba
Dispatched to:
LL.M. candidate, Columbia Law School
Duration
July 2015 - July 2016
Publication
1. Shinsai no Houritsu Soudan (Legal Consultations for Disaster-affected Persons) (co-authored)
2. Q&A Shougaikaji Kesu Sutadi : Rikon Kodomo, Haagu Jian No Jitsumu
(Q &A, Case Study on International Family Issues: Divorce, Children and Application of the Hague Convention)
 (co-authored)

Research theme:

Immigration policy/support for facilitating sustainable and beneficial acceptance of migrants

I originally became interested in migrants’ rights and how they were accepted into society through my experiences as a teenager in Canada, where diverse ethnic groups coexist. After working in the private sector, I entered the legal profession so that I could directly protect the rights of immigrants living in Japan, and since then worked on the protection of their rights mainly in the judiciary. While there is ongoing discussion in Japan on accepting more immigrants with the purpose of securing the labor force and maintaining its global competitiveness, there has not been enough consideration with regard to how and under what scheme immigrants should be accepted, leaving Japan still an immigrant-unfriendly society. Through my experience as a lawyer handling foreigners’ cases in such areas as immigration, labor and family law, as well as making policy recommendations regarding detention of irregular migrants, I realized that addressing the fundamental issues facing many immigrants would require the development of a more comprehensive immigration policy through effective lobbying, and coordination of various types of support beyond legal representation. Through the International Fellowship Program, I would like to acquire knowledge on immigration law, immigration policies and policy making methodologies in a systematic manner and then gain hands-on experience in advocacy and migrant support while working for organizations dealing with migration, in order to eventually contribute to improving the immigration policy and promoting the protection of migrants’ rights in Japan.

Kohei Kubo

Affiliation
Environmental Policy Bureau, Keidanren Japan Business Federation (general incorporated association)
Academic background
Faculty of Law, The University of Tokyo
Dispatched to:
Stanford Law School
Duration
July 2015 - June 2016

Research Theme:

Comparison of Legal and Economic Regulatory Methods, Economic Methods, and Autonomous Approaches

After joining Keidanren (Japan Business Federation) in 2006, I was involved in regulatory reforms as a member of Industrial Policy Bureau and public interest organization reforms as a member of the General Administration Bureau. In 2012, I was transferred to the Environment Policy Bureau because out of my wish to make global contributions by driving the utilization of the world’s leading energy-saving technologies developed by Japanese companies. In my current role, I am involved in the promotion of the Voluntary Action Plan on the Environment (currently called Keidanren’s Commitment to a Low-Carbon Society) which is set and pursued by individual industries to achieve their anti-global warming targets. I have also been involved in policy proposals designed to curb emissions from and improve energy efficiencies of fast-growing developing economies through expanded utilization of energy-saving technologies and products developed by Japanese companies while engaging in international negotiations related to climate change, to achieve a balance between the environment and economy through technology. Through the International Fellowship, I would like to study economics and other related fields at an American law school to gain academic knowledge and insights relating to the effects a legal system could have on corporate activities. Secondly, I would like to apply this knowledge to verify desirable policies through a comparison of the pros and cons of regulatory methods, economic methods and autonomous approaches.

Yasuhiko Kubota

Yasuhiko Kubo

Affiliation
Graduate student, Public Health Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University
Academic background
Degree, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka University
Dispatched to:
School of Public Health, University of Minnesota
Duration
August 2015 - August 2017

Research theme:

Public health approach to cardiovascular diseases

My desire to help people through work led me to study at the medical school of Osaka University; and since graduation in 2007, have been engaged in clinical practice and research as a cardiovascular surgeon. Through my experience as a surgeon, I came to realize that in many cases patients are left with serious damage to their hearts and brains even if their lives are saved, and find it hard to get back into society, resulting in serious national burdens in the form of decreased productivity and growing medical costs. I have entered the field of public health with the determination to address this issue. Through research and policy development, I pursue making society “healthier,” lowering mortality rates, increasing the ratio of healthy population while boosting the national overall productivity and reducing national medical costs. As an International Fellow, I would like to learn epidemiology, health policy and preventive medicine systematically at a graduate school of public health.

Naoko Hashimoto

Naoko Hashimoto

ACTIVITIES

Affiliation
Program Manager, International Organization for Migration (IOM) Tokyo Office
Academic background
Master of Studies in Forced Migration, Refugee Studies Centre, Department of International Development, University of Oxford
Dispatched to:
University of Sussex
Duration
August 2015 - August 2017
Publications
1.(Joint authorship) 『New Frontiers in Refugee and Forced Migration Studies (in Japanese)
2.(Joint authorship) 『Sekai no genba de bokutachi ga mananda ‘shigoto no kihon’ (“Work basics” we have learned in the world, in Japanese)
* All royalties Hashimoto receives for these books are donated to “Yukiko Foundation” set up in memory of her late colleague (Mrs.Yukiko Kumashiro Muli), to eradicate malaria and support girls’ education in developing countries.

Research theme:

Refugee Resettlement to Japan: Comparative study with European countries

My first encounter with refugee issues was when I worked as a student volunteer with refugee orphans in the former Yugoslavia. Since then, I have worked mainly as a practitioner in the field of protection and assistance to refugees and displaced populations for around 15 years, at such institutions as the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) in different countries. Since 2007, I also have been directly involved in support to foreign residents and formulation of migration policy in Japan, as well as the “Pilot Refugee Resettlement Programme.” While it was extremely innovative that a country like Japan, long considered to be hesitant to accept refugees, launched the refugee resettlement programme, it is still at its embryonic stage with room for further improvement. As an International Fellow, I would like to study refugee resettlement policies mainly in Europe, with a view to sharing and communicating relevant information interactively between Japan and other countries, and eventually to contributing to the global expansion of refugee resettlement.

Shinji Mizuno

Shinji Mizuno

Affiliation
Deputy Director, Safety Policy Division, Road Transport Bureau, Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism
Academic background
Degree, Faculty of Economics, Hitotsubashi University
Dispatched to:
MPP Program, National University of Singapore, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy
Duration
July 2015 - May 2017

Research theme:

Consideration of necessary public transport systems as a result of the development of city/town and scales, and the implementation of economics-oriented approaches to administrative services related to its maintenance, provision and benefits

Since joining the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) in 2007, I have been most keenly interested and concerned about the importance of building a public transport network. Japan is experiencing a significant deterioration in its public transport network, especially in regional cities and depopulated areas, due to declining birthrate, aging population as well as uneven distribution of population and increased motorization. While focus is often put on regional cities and depopulated areas when discussing public transport, it is important to note that this issue also exists in big cities, which indicates the need to identify issues facing big cities, regional cities and depopulated areas individually and take appropriate measures. However, Japan has long applied across-the-board approaches in managing its public transport system. Because of this, the issues and situations facing the existing public transport system could deteriorate further unless a truly needed public transport system is established immediately. I would like to take this opportunity to study abroad as an International Fellow to acquire necessary skills while learning at organizations in a country with advanced public transport policies to enhance my ability to plan and develop policies to deal with issues around the existing public transport, ultimately contributing to the development of an appropriate burden-focused public transport system.